Link roundup: accessible Paganism

As Paganism matures, we have to address a huge range of accessibility issues for our religion: physical accessibility for Pagans with mobility issues, assistance for Pagan parents, audiobooks for Pagans who are blind, sign language interpreters for deaf Pagans, inclusivity for LGBTQ Pagans, a welcoming atmosphere for Pagans of colour, accommodations for Pagans with allergies,…

Link roundup: accessible Paganism was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Advertisements

If only the activists see your activism, does it mean anything?

Every year, I go to a big local literary festival. I typically buy tickets for six or more events over the course of a week and come home with a pile of new books. I’ve mentioned before that this particular festival includes a territory acknowledgement before each event. This is something that started a year…

If only the activists see your activism, does it mean anything? was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Becoming Pagan 101

We’re not generally a religion that tries to convert people, but we are sometimes called a religion of converts – even now, very few Pagans grew up in the faith. Pagan Pride Project events might be as close as we come to proselytizing, simply by virtue of being public and publicized events. We’re into Pagan…

Becoming Pagan 101 was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Consent culture at Vancouver Pagan Pride Day

Last night, some members of Silver Spiral gathered to rehearse the ritual we’re presenting at Vancouver Pagan Pride Day (VPPD) on September 10th. Jamie Robyn and I had worked to create a very inclusive, accessible ritual that empowered the participants to participate. Our pre-ritual speeches include explicit permission to leave if needed, information on how…

Consent culture at Vancouver Pagan Pride Day was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

The politics of a religion of stolen place

I write this post on unceded Coast Salish territory, the ancestral and traditional territory of the Musqueam, Squamish, and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. As an uninvited guest on this land, I benefit from this land, its resources, and colonialism. Though acknowledgement is not sufficient to redress those wrongs, it is important for me, as a descendant…

The politics of a religion of stolen place was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Long form gone wrong

The reviews for “Witches of America” are in. The mainstream reviews are OK, but sound like a book that will be in the bargain bin within six months. The Pagan reviews, however, have been extremely critical of the author and her work, and this book’s impact on our community may be long-lived. The most in…

Long form gone wrong was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

I survived VPPD 2015

The organizer must have said a dozen times on the FaceBook page in posts and comments: “Pagan Pride is on, rain or shine.”     The forecast wasn’t promising, but it is Vancouver, and you never know what’s going to happen.   I joked with the lady at the coffee shop that I need a…

I survived VPPD 2015 was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Responsible to the centres

This past weekend, I went to my 18th Gathering for Life on Earth. There were rituals, and swimming, and workshops, and feasting, but best of all, there were juicy conversations. One of my favourite people to talk to every year is a brilliant woman who runs a local Pagan choir and who does a sung…

Responsible to the centres was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic

Giving a way out

It has come up in conversation a couple of times recently: How do you leave a ritual?   If you are a parent with a small child who needs you in the other room…   If you are a parent wearing an infant who wakes fussy mid-ritual…   If you suddenly feel ill…   If…

Giving a way out was originally published on We're Made of Mud and Magic